Hydraulic accumulators are energy-storing or “vitality-stockpiling” devices akin to rechargeable batteries in electrical systems. They are designed to store energy provided by pressurized fluid whenever needed which can be later extracted as required, making them an indispensable tool for efficient aircraft hydraulic systems used in landing gear. The advantages of using hydraulic accumulators include, but are not restricted to, lesser power requirements, reductions in systemic heat, and readily available energy. Thus, seeing how accumulators can be beneficial in contributing to aircraft efficiency, learning about them is imperative.


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Retaining rings are metal fasteners installed in grooves to create a shoulder for holding an assembly together. They have a compact design and are very light as compared to other fasteners. Retaining rings can also be referred to as circlip rings or snap rings. Retaining rings are commonly used in fitness equipment, storage brackets, wind turbines, bicycles, gas pumps, doorknobs, office equipment, and many other applications.


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An accumulator is a storage reservoir containing an incompressible hydraulic fluid that is pressurized by an external source of mechanical energy. This mechanical energy is often supplied by an engine, a spring, and a compressed gas. Accumulators offer a number of benefits, some of which will be outlined in this blog.


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The pump is one of the most versatile tools in any industry, and it is used for numerous applications across varying verticals. We all have seen a pump in our house which is used for domestic purposes like transporting water and waste for appliances. Regardless of the application, a pump is a mechanical device used to draw fluid by converting mechanical energy into hydraulic energy. They create pressure differences between their intake and discharge valves, and pump fluids at high pressure.


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Air compressors are a crucial component in industrial settings and are commonly employed in tools for manufacturing. This technology is easy to use, cost-effective, and generally reliable with long operational lifespans. However, like all tools and equipment, it is important to perform regular maintenance on air compressors to ensure their optimal performance. In this blog, we will highlight the importance of regularly inspecting and changing air filters, which are a critical element in air compressor technology.


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Flare and flareless fittings are compression fittings that are used with tubing that is usually made of soft steel, ductile copper, and aluminum. Whether you utilize a flare or flareless fitting depends on the application at hand. To clear up confusion between these two fittings, this blog will cover their differences, uses, and distinguishing features.


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When two or more parts are assembled together, it is often quite beneficial to fill any gaps that exist between components for the means of preventing leaking, damage, or other issues. With elastic components known as rubber gaskets, the areas between mating surfaces or joints can be filled with ease. Generally, these assemblies come in the form of piping, fittings, door edges, frames, and other joined surfaces that may present gaps. With the ability of gaskets to fill irregular surfaces and provide a seal, it can be highly beneficial to familiarize yourself with such components and their common types.


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A flange, often called a pipe flange or flange gasket, is a type of mechanical element used to join two pipes together, or serves as a provisional seal for the end of a single pipe. These round disks contain holes for bolts around the rim and come in a variety of shapes, sizes, diameters, and materials. As such, some are utilized for blocking high-pressure pipes while others are used to attach two pipes of differing materials. In this blog, we will be covering the different types of flanges and their uses, as well as the materials and shapes they come in so that you can better understand what kind of flange your application requires.


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While the aviation industry is continuously seeking new ways to create the propulsion needed for flight, an overwhelming majority of currently operating aircraft rely on the combustion of fuel and air mixtures. In order to achieve optimal combustion properties for efficient flight operations, the proper amount of fuel and air must be measured and mixed together. While there are a number of systems that may provide for such needs, the carburetor is a device that commonly serves general aviation aircraft. For its basic operation, the carburetor ensures that intake air is properly measured and mixed with an optimal amount of fuel, providing the resulting mixture to the cylinder intake for combustion. To better understand why such devices are crucial for the flight capabilities of many aircraft, we will discuss their design and operations in more detail.


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A gasket is a common component to countless assemblies, coming in the form of a mechanical seal which may take up the space between two or more mating surfaces while under compression. As a component that may come in many diverse types, gaskets may be flexible materials that are constructed from rubber, paper, cork, or countless other substances. While featuring numerous grades that may benefit different applications, gaskets are most commonly compressed between surfaces for the means of preventing leaks, reducing noise, mitigating vibration, providing mounting support, and much more. In this blog, we will discuss gaskets and their working principles more in detail, also providing common types that may be used for varying applications.


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Throughout the aerospace industry, flared or flareless fittings are used to attach sections of tubing. The SAE Aerospace Standards, commonly known as AS Standards, establish the requirements for fittings used in fluid systems throughout many types of aircraft. There are six common thread styles and connections used in aerospace fittings: AN 24 fittings, AN 37 fittings, O-ring bosses (ORBs), National Pipe Thread (NPT), hose barbs, and hose clamps. In this blog, we will discuss each type.


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A constant speed propeller is a variable pitch propeller that automatically adjusts the pitch of the propeller to maintain a desired RPM. Unlike fixed-pitch propellers, which only operate at maximum efficiency during a single stage of flight, constant speed propellers are able to adjust to provide peak performance during each phase. Excessive pitch in a propeller creates drag and hinders power, while too little pitch causes the engine to work harder to reach the desired speed. Constant speed propellers eliminate this problem by partially rotating along their longest axis to alter its pitch, thereby increasing or decreasing its exposure to the air depending on airspeed. The vast majority of high-performance propeller-driven aircraft use constant speed propellers to help protect their powerful engines from excessive wear.


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Rigid fluid lines are used throughout aircraft for fuel, oil, coolant, oxygen, instrument, and hydraulic lines. They are used in stationary applications where long and relatively straight runs are possible. To function properly, rigid fluid lines utilize a wide range of fittings. These include AN flared fittings, MS flareless fittings, swaged fittings, and cryofit fittings. In this blog, we will discuss each type of fitting and their unique characteristics.


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When determining the altitude, altitude trend, or airspeed of a given aircraft, pilots rely on measurements that have been gathered from the capturing of atmospheric air and flight deck instruments. With a device known as the pitot tube, ram air pressure can be measured by instruments in order to attain flight pertinent information that benefits safety and efficiency. To understand how instruments such as the airspeed or altitude indicator function, one must first be knowledgeable of the pitot tube and its operations.


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When constructing an aircraft and its various structures, a great number of fasteners are utilized to conjoin parts and components to form assemblies. Screws and bolts are two common aircraft fastener types that are widely used throughout the construction process, and both are often confused with one another due to their similar designs and appearances. Despite their common characteristics, bolts and screws present different uses for aircraft construction, each providing their unique benefits and drawbacks which make them optimal for their respective applications.


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Valves are indispensable components of fluid systems, allowing for the regulation and control of fluid flow and pressure. Solenoid valves in particular are a type of electrically controlled valve, allowing for remote control for opening and closing. Solenoid valves are extremely useful, allowing for more complex piping systems that can utilize automatic control to both create an ease of operation, as well as increase safety of workers for plumbing systems that are in hazardous areas.


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The first airplanes did not come equipped with such technology like vacuum pumps installed on them. On the contrary, the suction that was needed to manage the inner gyro equipment was supplied by a venturi tube that was placed on the outside of the aircraft. Venturi tubes were simple and manageable but they did come with many disadvantages because it was so dynamic, meaning the aircraft was forced to be constantly moving at a fairly high speed to develop enough vacuum to run the instruments. Not only that but this tube needed to rotate the gyros before the venturi could start being used and it left the system exposed to the elements. What eventually solved this problem was the engine-driven vacuum pumps which we’ll go over more in detail below. 


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A stabilizer is an aerodynamic control surface that provides longitudinal and/or direction stability and control.  A stabilizer can feature a fixed or adjustable structure on which any movable control surfaces are hinged, or can be a fully movable surface such as a stabilator. Depending on the configuration, the stabilizer may only refer to the front part of the control surface. There are three primary types of stabilizers: Horizontal stabilizers, vertical stabilizers, and combined longitudinal-directional stabilizers. This blog will explain each type, their differences, and their functions.


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An air compressor does just that -- it compresses air. Air compression is achieved by an increase of air pressure. This pressure can then be used for its kinetic energy and released incrementally to provide a reactive function. Take for example, a nail gun. When a nail gun is connected by a hose to an air compressor and you pull the trigger, the pressurized air in that storage tank is released. This release allows the pressure built up in the storage tank to shoot out like popping a pimple. Much the same, a pressure washer and pressure washer parts create the same effect with water. 


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Hydraulic systems in aircraft are a very important and complex system, and always need to be maintained adhering to the highest standard. As an aircraft hydraulic systems, or AHS, is vital to the aircraft’s performance and safety, it’s crucial that it works at peak efficiency with as little downtime as possible. As they are a very intricate system that serve many different functions, understanding aviation hydraulic systems is the first step to their maintenance.


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You can fold up a piece of paper, give it two wings, and watch it fly. However, you do not have the ability to pick where the paper plane lands or alter how fast it gets there. This is because you most likely did not add propellers to your paper plane. Two recognizable features of an aircraft are the wings and the aircraft propellers. Both of these parts allow the pilot to control the aircraft and navigate it through the skies. Aircraft wings and propellers each manipulate the air in which the aircraft is flying in. The wings, also known as airfoils, direct and redirect the airflow around the aircraft. The propellers are designed to produce thrust, thus, moving the plane forward.


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It’s the new normal, to be able to fly from point A to point B, thousands of miles away, in a matter of hours. And yet, the mechanics of this “simple” act are still unknown to a vast majority of people. We take for granted all the advancements and innovations that it took to allow us to travel so far and so fast as regularly as we do. So, it makes sense that to the average person, “turbonormalizing” and “turbocharging” sound like they mean the same thing. Or they remind people of the Fast and Furious franchise. Surprisingly, that’s not entirely wrong.


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