A gasket is a common component to countless assemblies, coming in the form of a mechanical seal which may take up the space between two or more mating surfaces while under compression. As a component that may come in many diverse types, gaskets may be flexible materials that are constructed from rubber, paper, cork, or countless other substances. While featuring numerous grades that may benefit different applications, gaskets are most commonly compressed between surfaces for the means of preventing leaks, reducing noise, mitigating vibration, providing mounting support, and much more. In this blog, we will discuss gaskets and their working principles more in detail, also providing common types that may be used for varying applications.


Read more »


For an electrical circuit to properly manage current for various components, there are often times in which current needs to be restricted. Generally, current restriction is achievable through increasing the resistance of a circuit, or one may simply reduce the amount of voltage flowing through it. With a device known as a rheostat, the flow of current within an electrical circuit may be controlled through the means of increasing or decreasing resistance.


Read more »


Throughout the aerospace industry, flared or flareless fittings are used to attach sections of tubing. The SAE Aerospace Standards, commonly known as AS Standards, establish the requirements for fittings used in fluid systems throughout many types of aircraft. There are six common thread styles and connections used in aerospace fittings: AN 24 fittings, AN 37 fittings, O-ring bosses (ORBs), National Pipe Thread (NPT), hose barbs, and hose clamps. In this blog, we will discuss each type.


Read more »


A constant speed propeller is a variable pitch propeller that automatically adjusts the pitch of the propeller to maintain a desired RPM. Unlike fixed-pitch propellers, which only operate at maximum efficiency during a single stage of flight, constant speed propellers are able to adjust to provide peak performance during each phase. Excessive pitch in a propeller creates drag and hinders power, while too little pitch causes the engine to work harder to reach the desired speed. Constant speed propellers eliminate this problem by partially rotating along their longest axis to alter its pitch, thereby increasing or decreasing its exposure to the air depending on airspeed. The vast majority of high-performance propeller-driven aircraft use constant speed propellers to help protect their powerful engines from excessive wear.


Read more »


Rigid fluid lines are used throughout aircraft for fuel, oil, coolant, oxygen, instrument, and hydraulic lines. They are used in stationary applications where long and relatively straight runs are possible. To function properly, rigid fluid lines utilize a wide range of fittings. These include AN flared fittings, MS flareless fittings, swaged fittings, and cryofit fittings. In this blog, we will discuss each type of fitting and their unique characteristics.


Read more »


When determining the altitude, altitude trend, or airspeed of a given aircraft, pilots rely on measurements that have been gathered from the capturing of atmospheric air and flight deck instruments. With a device known as the pitot tube, ram air pressure can be measured by instruments in order to attain flight pertinent information that benefits safety and efficiency. To understand how instruments such as the airspeed or altitude indicator function, one must first be knowledgeable of the pitot tube and its operations.


Read more »


When operating assemblies with moving parts, bearings serve as crucial components that facilitate motion, transfer loads, and provide lubrication to mitigate friction. When designed for use in aircraft, such bearings are made to be highly robust in order to withstand the extreme conditions of flight. As such, aerospace bearings are manufactured to meet military specifications as dictated by the United States government and are often capable of withstanding forces such as corrosion, extreme temperatures, and shock. Depending on the needs of a particular assembly, various types of bearings may be used with different sizes, weights, and load capacity requirements.


Read more »


A diode is a type of electronic component that features two-terminals, and they allow for current to be conducted in a single direction. With operations similar to that of a fluid valve, diodes may be used within electronic circuits in order to dictate the patch of electricity as it moves through a system. While simplistic in their functionality, a diode’s ability to maintain a single direction of current while impeding any reverse flow is beneficial for a number of electronic systems and applications. In this blog, we will discuss the common types of diodes and their functionalities, allowing you to understand their various uses in electronic systems.


Read more »


Though ethernet switches, routers, and modems look similar at a glance, they each play a different role within a network. This blog will discuss what each of these three devices are, how they are different, and how they function within a network.


Read more »


When constructing an aircraft and its various structures, a great number of fasteners are utilized to conjoin parts and components to form assemblies. Screws and bolts are two common aircraft fastener types that are widely used throughout the construction process, and both are often confused with one another due to their similar designs and appearances. Despite their common characteristics, bolts and screws present different uses for aircraft construction, each providing their unique benefits and drawbacks which make them optimal for their respective applications.


Read more »


Valves are indispensable components of fluid systems, allowing for the regulation and control of fluid flow and pressure. Solenoid valves in particular are a type of electrically controlled valve, allowing for remote control for opening and closing. Solenoid valves are extremely useful, allowing for more complex piping systems that can utilize automatic control to both create an ease of operation, as well as increase safety of workers for plumbing systems that are in hazardous areas.


Read more »


The first airplanes did not come equipped with such technology like vacuum pumps installed on them. On the contrary, the suction that was needed to manage the inner gyro equipment was supplied by a venturi tube that was placed on the outside of the aircraft. Venturi tubes were simple and manageable but they did come with many disadvantages because it was so dynamic, meaning the aircraft was forced to be constantly moving at a fairly high speed to develop enough vacuum to run the instruments. Not only that but this tube needed to rotate the gyros before the venturi could start being used and it left the system exposed to the elements. What eventually solved this problem was the engine-driven vacuum pumps which we’ll go over more in detail below. 


Read more »


A gas turbine, also known as a combustion turbine, is a type of continuous and internal combustion engine. The basic operation of a gas turbine engine is as such: atmospheric air flows through the compressor where it is brought to higher pressure. Here, energy is added by spraying fuel into the air and igniting it to create a high-temperature flow. This pressurized gas enters the turbine, producing a shaft work output used to drive the compressor. The unused energy comes out in the form of exhaust gases. Each part of the gas turbine has an important role in its operation, but the most critical components of it are the compressor, combustion chamber, and the turbine. This blog will explain each part as well as its role within the engine as a whole.


Read more »


A stabilizer is an aerodynamic control surface that provides longitudinal and/or direction stability and control.  A stabilizer can feature a fixed or adjustable structure on which any movable control surfaces are hinged, or can be a fully movable surface such as a stabilator. Depending on the configuration, the stabilizer may only refer to the front part of the control surface. There are three primary types of stabilizers: Horizontal stabilizers, vertical stabilizers, and combined longitudinal-directional stabilizers. This blog will explain each type, their differences, and their functions.


Read more »


Within the realm of aviation, hoses may be used for a variety of systems and applications. From fuel lines to hydraulic systems, aircraft hoses are an important component for standard operations. In general, hoses are a flexible tube that may be used to transport fluids between two locations. Depending on their application, hoses may vary in their materials, pressure rating, flexibility, and other factors. Common hose materials that are used across standard applications include synthetic rubbers, natural rubbers, PVC, nylon, polyurethane, and polyethylene. In this blog, we will provide an overview of the aircraft tubing system, and how hoses benefit aviation and related activities.


Read more »


A heat exchanger is a device that allows heat from a liquid or gas to pass onto a second fluid without the two fluids having to mix together or come into direct contact with one another. In simpler terms, the heat exchanger transfers heat without transferring the source of said heat. They are commonly used to cool hydraulics, ram air, auxiliary power units, gearboxes, and many other components found in an aircraft.


Read more »


An air compressor does just that -- it compresses air. Air compression is achieved by an increase of air pressure. This pressure can then be used for its kinetic energy and released incrementally to provide a reactive function. Take for example, a nail gun. When a nail gun is connected by a hose to an air compressor and you pull the trigger, the pressurized air in that storage tank is released. This release allows the pressure built up in the storage tank to shoot out like popping a pimple. Much the same, a pressure washer and pressure washer parts create the same effect with water. 


Read more »


The propeller, an essential part of an aircraft, is a device that converts rotational energy from the engine into propulsive force. Though the propeller is a relatively straightforward piece of machinery, it comes in many different variations depending on the performance requirements of a given aircraft. Here are the six most common types of aircraft propellers and their unique characteristics.


Read more »


Most people know, simply from looking upwards at a flying aircraft, that planes have their own set of lights attached to them. However only pilots, aircraft mechanics and others in the industry know what each light means and why they are positioned the way that they are. For a basic outline on aircraft lights and when they are utilized, read on below.


Read more »


Aircraft tires are one of the most important components of an aircraft for taxiing, takeoff, and landing. Because of the high amount of stress that is endured with each flight, it is critical that they are regularly inspected and replaced as necessary. There are many factors that may decide whether a tire should undergo MRO, and monitoring these signs and more can help you know when it is time for repair and replacement.


Read more »


Hydraulic systems in aircraft are a very important and complex system, and always need to be maintained adhering to the highest standard. As an aircraft hydraulic systems, or AHS, is vital to the aircraft’s performance and safety, it’s crucial that it works at peak efficiency with as little downtime as possible. As they are a very intricate system that serve many different functions, understanding aviation hydraulic systems is the first step to their maintenance.


Read more »


Instruments in an aircraft have two purposes: to display current flight conditions (such as airspeed and altitude) and to notify of unsatisfactory or dangerous conditions. Standardized colors are used to differentiate between visual messages, with green as a satisfactory condition, yellow for caution or a serious condition that needs monitoring, and red as a color for unsatisfactory or dangerous conditions.


Read more »


An aircraft propeller consists of two or more blades mounted on a central hub connected via a shaft to the engine. This can be either an extension of the engine’s crankshaft in low-horsepower engines, or a propeller shaft geared to the crankshaft in high-horsepower configurations. In either case, each blade of the propeller essentially acts as a rotating wing, which produces force that creates thrust to pull or push the aircraft through the air. The vast majority of aircraft have a “tractor” arrangement, where the propeller is mounted towards the front of the fuselage and pulls the aircraft, but there are examples of “pusher” arrangements where the propeller is mounted in the back and pushes the aircraft through the air.


Read more »


You can fold up a piece of paper, give it two wings, and watch it fly. However, you do not have the ability to pick where the paper plane lands or alter how fast it gets there. This is because you most likely did not add propellers to your paper plane. Two recognizable features of an aircraft are the wings and the aircraft propellers. Both of these parts allow the pilot to control the aircraft and navigate it through the skies. Aircraft wings and propellers each manipulate the air in which the aircraft is flying in. The wings, also known as airfoils, direct and redirect the airflow around the aircraft. The propellers are designed to produce thrust, thus, moving the plane forward.


Read more »


Compressors reduce air volume and therefore increase its pressure. This device is utilized in engines to increase the amount of air allotted to the combustion chamber— the more air that can be added, the more an engine can burn and produce more power. An air compressor specifically compresses air, as opposed to other compressors that condense different types of gases. There are many types of compressors that have been developed for various applications, and new technology and designs have increased efficiency throughout the years.


Read more »


Almost all modern turbine engine aircraft incorporate air compressors in their systems. Turbine engines use an air compressor to increase the pressure of incoming air before it enters the combustor. There are two types of air compressor used in aviation, axial and centrifugal.


Read more »


It’s the new normal, to be able to fly from point A to point B, thousands of miles away, in a matter of hours. And yet, the mechanics of this “simple” act are still unknown to a vast majority of people. We take for granted all the advancements and innovations that it took to allow us to travel so far and so fast as regularly as we do. So, it makes sense that to the average person, “turbonormalizing” and “turbocharging” sound like they mean the same thing. Or they remind people of the Fast and Furious franchise. Surprisingly, that’s not entirely wrong.


Read more »


Propellers are, single-handedly, the most noticeable part on an aircraft. Using energy from the engine to spin, the aircraft propeller is used to create thrust by rotation.

Depending on the type of aircraft, the propeller can look very differently. The number of blades increases as the size of the aircraft engine increases, to ensure proper power distribution. And, propeller blades can vary in material, such as wood, fiberglass, composites, and metals, depending on how strong or durable they have to be. 


Read more »


Recent Twitter Posts

Why Choose Us?

Low Price Warrantied inventory at competitive prices

Find it fast Search the world's largest inventory of electronic components by manufacturer, category or part number

Quality guaranteed We sell only warrantied and traceable parts

Get it fast All inventory ready to ship from our sellers

Semiconductor's Certifications and Memberships
Thank You for Visiting Us today.

Remember That With Us At Methodical Purchasing, You Can Get A Competitive Quote for Parts Within Fifteen Minutes By Filling Out the Request for Quote form On the Homepage.

Request for Quote